Image from page 43 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)

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Image from page 43 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)
Personal Care
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: stnicholasserial4721dodg
Title: St. Nicholas [serial]
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.]
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Text Appearing Before Image:
iful Naomi Lake, 2000 feet above sea, in pine-laden air ofPocono Mounlains. Four hours from New York and Philadelphia.Bungalows and tents on sunny hill. Kxperienced counselors. Tennis,baseball, canoeing, hikes—all outdoor sports. Handicrafts, gar-dening. 9th season. Miss Blanche D. Price, 404 W. School Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. Massachusetts, Worcester. LIN-E-KIN BAY CAMP Ideal camp for girls on the coast of Maine. Personal care. Arts andcrafts, land and water sports, boating of all kinds, hikes, clambakes,physical training, dramatics and dancing. Address Mb. and Mrs. G. R. Branch, 64 Fruit St., Worcester, Ma.ss. Wisconsin, Lake Snowdon, near Rhinelander. CAMP BRYN AFON FOR GIRLS 1000 feet above sea level. Screened sleeping bungalows with hardwood floors; saddle horses; athletic held; craft house; infirmary. Allland and water sports. Faculty composed of 15 college graduates-,each one a specialist. For illustrated booklet write to Miss LoTTA B. Broadbridge, 15 Oweu Ave., Detroit, Mich.

Text Appearing After Image:
(Hiss ALICE H. BELDiNG. A.BBox 16, Randolph Macon CollegeLynchburg, Virginia. CAMPCHEQUESSET The Nautical Campfor Girls On the Tip of Cape Cod All the fu n of life m and oi>theroaring Allantic. Woodlore, arts and crafts, scout-ing, camp crafts. All heldsports. Aquaplaning,sailing, motor boating,awimraing, fishing. Bun-galows and tents. Eachgirl always in the care oian expert.iiZSj Writeforillustratedbooldrt. WM. G. VINAL, A.M.,Box 23, R. I. Normal School,Providence. R. I. Canaan, N. H. Why do more than62% of Wuttaunohgirls return? Its the horses, theswims, the hikes, thegames, the good will, thelielpfulness, the friend-ships and the place,they just cant help it. We can admit abouttwenty-five new Wuttau-noh girls this year. Cat-alog. Prof, and Mrs, Elhan Allen ShawNORTHFIELD, Vt.

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Image from page 349 of “The Saturday evening post” (1839)
Personal Care
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Identifier: saturdayeveningp1933unse
Title: The Saturday evening post
Year: 1839 (1830s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Graham
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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—but it would have been a long,hard day without a Royal THE Royal Typewriter speeds up thedays work and sets the pace to thequickstep of efficiency.Because the Royals rapid-fire action andadjustable personal touch takes the grindout of typewriting. For it adds to the sensitive fingers of thetypist the one vital thing that the old-styletypewriter subtracts—speed!The speed with brains behind it—the reallife speed of the expert typist, setting thepace that pays. Errorless speed is the kind of speed that counts—common sense has punctured the illusion of theother kind. Allday speed, throbbing evenly with the big, steadypulse of modern business—thats the speed of theRoyal Typewriter. Compare the Work!9

Text Appearing After Image:
ROYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY, Inc.Royal Typewriter Building, 364-366 Broadway, New YorkBranches and Agencies the World Over TYPEWRITERS THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 165 (Continued front Page 162) the last person in the world to have a help-ful suggestion. If anything dropped downa grating, for instance, he never had theleast idea how to get it out. Once whenBeany had caught his finger in a wringer hehad to go all the way upstairs and get hismother to explain how they might liberateit. Now, however, he had suddenly becomea mine of resourcefulness. Beany felt in-stinctively that it would be useless tostruggle. I may break the knife, he said weakly. Go ahead, said the generous boy. Itsan old one. I thought you just got it for your birth-day? Oh, well, I dont care about it! Beany shut his eyes, took a long breathand struck at the little pane of glass. Therewas a tinkle and an exclamation. He hadstruck so hard that he had hurt his fingeron the side of the opening. Pull it! Pull it! cried Ganglesh

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Missouri Avenue school, Roswell NM – 1992
Personal Care
Image by Ed Yourdon
This is the elementary school that I attended in Roswell in 1953-54. Sadly, I have absolutely no memories of it at all. Indeed, I have no idea who I was able to track it down when I came through this area nearly 40 years later …

It’s not too far from the house in Roswell, NM where I lived with my parents and two of my five sisters. The photo was taken nearly 40 years after we first moved into the house, as part of some research that I was doing for a novel called Do-Overs, the beginning of which can be found here on my website

www.yourdon.com/personal/fiction/doovers/index.html

and the relevant chapter (concerning Roswell) can be found here:

www.yourdon.com/personal/fiction/doovers/chapters/ch7.html

Before I get into the details, let me make a strong request — if you’re looking at these photos, and if you are getting any enjoyment at all of this brief look at some mundane Americana from 60+ years ago: find a similar episode in your own life, and write it down. Gather the pictures, clean them up, and upload them somewhere on the Internet where they can be found. Trust me: there will come a day when the only person on the planet who actually experienced those events is you. Your own memories may be fuzzy and incomplete; but they will be invaluable to your friends and family members, and to many generations of your descendants.

So, what do I remember about the year that I spent in Roswell? Not much at the moment, though I’m sure more details will occur to me in the days to come — and I’ll add them to these notes, along with additional photos that I’m tweaking and editing now (including some of the drive from Roswell to Riverside, CA where our family moved next), as well as some “real” contemporaneous photos I’ve found in family scrapbooks.

For now, here is a random list of things I remember:

I discovered roller skates while I lived here — perhaps aided by the presence of nice, smooth, wide sidewalks throughout this whole area of town. Sometimes my mother sent me on a small shopping expedition to the local grocery store, about two blocks away, to buy a quart of milk or a couple of other minor things. The shorts that I wore had no pockets (I have no idea why), so I put the coins that my mother gave me into my mouth, for safekeeping. That way, I had both hands free in case I tripped and fell … but if I had done so, I probably would have swallowed the coins.
For Christmas that year (i.e., Christmas of 1953), I was given a .22-caliber rifle. Even today, it would cause only a shrug in many rural parts of the U.S.; and it was certainly unremarkable in the 1950s. My dad felt that every boy should have a rifle, and should learn how to shoot it, clean it, and take care of it in a responsible fashion. I think his intention was to take me out into the open area outside of Roswell, to shoot at rabbits or gophers; but we ended up shooting at cans and bottles in the local dump.
In 1953, Roswell had not acquired any fame or attention for its proximity to the alleged alien landing in 1947. Trust me: if there had been even a hint of a rumor, the young kids in that town would have heard about it. Whatever may (or may not) have happened there . If you have no idea what this is all about, take a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident
For young boys, it was great sport to shoot at moving creatures. Dogs and cats were considered off-limits; and as implied above, we were not allowed to wander the streets with a .22 rifle. But we all had slingshots, and there were an infinite number of lizards in the area. Unfortunately, lizard were far too quick to hit with a relatively inaccurate slingshot (especially if shot with an unevenly-shaped rock; and it was only a year later, in California, that I began shooting marbles). Our greatest success was actually with slower creatures: horned toads, usually referred to as “horny toads,” or just “horns.” Indeed, they were slow enough that you could capture them with bare hands. You probably have no idea what I’m talking about, so take a look at this National Geographic article: animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/reptiles/horned-toad/

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